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Best UX Books for the UX Designer

Want to be an excellent designer? Looking for the best UI/UX books and resources?

Get the right information for becoming an outstanding UI/UX designer – Just follow me. A list of Best UX books, which are recommended by the major UX professionals and blogs.

100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People – by Susan Weinschenk

http://amzn.to/2BxHxmO

We design to elicit responses from people. We want them to buy something, read more, or take action of some kind. Designing without understanding what makes people act the way they do is like exploring a new city without a map: results will be haphazard, confusing, and inefficient.

This book combines real science and research with practical examples to deliver a guide every designer needs. With it you’ll be able to design more intuitive and engaging work for print, websites, applications, and products that matches the way people think, work, and play.

Learn to increase the effectiveness, conversion rates, and usability of your own design projects by finding the answers to questions such as:

  • What grabs and holds attention on a page or screen?
  • What makes memories stick?
  • What is more important, peripheral or central vision?
  • How can you predict the types of errors that people will make?
  • What is the limit to someone’s social circle?
  • How do you motivate people to continue on to (the next step?
  • What line length for text is best?
  • Are some fonts better than others?

These are just a few of the questions that the book answers in its deep-dive exploration of what makes people tick.

Get your copy – click here


A Project Guide to UX Design: For user experience designers in the field or in the making – by Russ Unger, Carolyn Chandler

http://amzn.to/2BfDRJm

User experience design is the discipline of creating a useful and usable Web site or application that’s easily navigated and meets the needs of the site owner and its users.

There’s a lot more to successful UX design than knowing the latest Web technologies or design trends: It takes diplomacy, management skills, and business savvy. That’s where the updated edition of this important book comes in.

With new information on design principles, mobile and gestural interactions, content strategy, remote research tools and more, you’ll learn to:

  • Recognize the various roles in UX design, identify stakeholders, and enlist their support
  • Obtain consensus from your team on project objectives
  • Understand approaches such as Waterfall, Agile, and Lean UX
  • Define the scope of your project and avoid mission creep
  • Conduct user research in person or remotely, and document your findings
  • Understand and communicate user behavior with personas
  • Design and prototype your application or site
  • Plan for development, product rollout, and ongoing quality assurance

Get your copy – click here


The UX Book: Process and Guidelines for Ensuring a Quality User Experience – by Rex Hartson, Pardha S. Pyla

http://amzn.to/2Bd203A

The UX Book: Process and Guidelines for Ensuring a Quality User Experience aims to help readers learn how to create and refine interaction designs that ensure a quality user experience (UX). The book seeks to expand the concept of traditional usability to a broader notion of user experience; to provide a hands-on, practical guide to best practices and established principles in a UX lifecycle; and to describe a pragmatic process for managing the overall development effort.
The book provides an iterative and evaluation-centered UX lifecycle template, called the Wheel, for interaction design. Key concepts discussed include contextual inquiry and analysis; extracting interaction design requirements; constructing design-informing models; design production; UX goals, metrics, and targets; prototyping; UX evaluation; the interaction cycle and the user action framework; and UX design guidelines.

This book will be useful to anyone interested in learning more about creating interaction designs to ensure a quality user experience. These include interaction designers, graphic designers, usability analysts, software engineers, programmers, systems analysts, software quality-assurance specialists, human factors engineers, cognitive psychologists, cosmic psychics, trainers, technical writers, documentation specialists, marketing personnel, and project managers.

  • A very broad approach to user experience through its components—usability, usefulness, and emotional impact with special attention to lightweight methods such as rapid UX evaluation techniques and an agile UX development process
  • Universal applicability of processes, principles, and guidelines—not just for GUIs and the Web, but for all kinds of interaction and devices: embodied interaction, mobile devices, ATMs, refrigerators, and elevator controls, and even highway signage
  • Extensive design guidelines applied in the context of the various kinds of affordances necessary to support all aspects of interaction
  • Real-world stories and contributions from accomplished UX practitioners
  • A practical guide to best practices and established principles in UX
  • A lifecycle template that can be instantiated and tailored to a given project, for a given type of system development, on a given budget

Get your copy – click here


Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability – by Steve Krug

http://amzn.to/2CCBpcj

Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design. Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject.

Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And it’s still short, profusely illustrated…and best of all–fun to read.

If you’ve read it before, you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world. If you’ve never read it, you’ll see why so many people have said it should be required reading for anyone working on Web sites.

“After reading it over a couple of hours and putting its ideas to work for the past five years, I can say it has done more to improve my abilities as a Web designer than any other book.”
–Jeffrey Zeldman, author of Designing with Web Standards

Get your copy – click here


The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the Web and Beyond – by Jesse James Garrett

http://amzn.to/2D5KknO

From the moment it was published almost ten years ago, Elements of User Experience became a vital reference for web and interaction designers the world over, and has come to define the core principles of the practice. Now, in this updated, expanded, and full-color new edition, Jesse James Garrett has refined his thinking about the Web, going beyond the desktop to include information that also applies to the sudden proliferation of mobile devices and applications.

Successful interaction design requires more than just creating clean code and sharp graphics. You must also fulfill your strategic objectives while meeting the needs of your users. Even the best content and the most sophisticated technology won’t help you balance those goals without a cohesive, consistent user experience to support it.

With so many issues involved—usability, brand identity, information architecture, interaction design— creating the user experience can be overwhelmingly complex. This new edition of The Elements of User Experience cuts through that complexity with clear explanations and vivid illustrations that focus on ideas rather than tools or techniques. Garrett gives readers the big picture of user experience development, from strategy and requirements to information architecture and visual design.

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Killer UX Design: Create User Experiences to Wow Your Visitors 1st Edition – by Jodie Moule

http://amzn.to/2CF8rID

Today, technology is used to shift, sway and change attitudes and behavior. This creates amazing opportunities and challenges for designers. If we want to create products and services that have the power to educate people so they may live better lives, or help to reduce the time people take to do certain tasks, we first need an understanding of how these people think and work – what makes them “tick”

The premise of this book is the need to understand how people “behave”; their habits, motivators and drivers, as a critical way to better understand what a great customer experience for your audience looks like, facilitating better design decisions. The book will lead you from understanding behavior, to extracting customer insights that can launch you into the design of something that makes a difference to people’s lives – all presented in a fun, practical and non-academic way.

Get your copy – click here


Lean UX: Designing Great Products with Agile Teams Hardcover – by Jeff Gothelf,‎ Josh Seiden

http://amzn.to/2yWysRx

Lean UX has become the preferred approach to interaction design, tailor-made for today’s agile teams. In the second edition of this award winning book, leading advocates Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden expand on the valuable Lean UX principles, tactics, and techniques covered in the first edition to share how product teams can easily incorporate design, experimentation, iteration, and continuous learning from real users into their Agile process.

Inspired by Lean and Agile development theories, Lean UX lets you focus on the actual experience being designed, rather than deliverables. This book shows you how to collaborate closely with other members of your Agile product team, and gather feedback early and often. You’ll learn how to drive the design in short, iterative cycles to assess what works best for the business and the user. Lean UX shows you how to make this change—for the better.

  • Frame a vision of the problem you’re solving and focus your team on the right outcomes
  • Bring the designers’ toolkit to the rest of your product team
  • Share your insights with your team much earlier in the process
  • Create Minimum Viable Products to determine which ideas are valid
  • Incorporate the voice of the customer throughout the project cycle
  • Make your team more productive: combine Lean UX with Agile’s Scrum framework
  • Understand the organizational shifts necessary to integrate Lean UX

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Sketching User Experiences – by Saul Greenberg, Sheelagh Carpendale, Nicolai Marquardt

http://amzn.to/2Bx4I0w

Sketching Working Experience: The Workbook provides information about the step-by-step process of the different sketching techniques. It offers methods called design thinking, as a way to think as a user, and sketching, a way to think as a designer. User-experience designers are designers who sketch based on their actions, interactions, and experiences.
The book discusses the differences between the normal ways to sketch and sketching used by user-experience designers. It also describes some motivation on why a person should sketch and introduces the sketchbook. The book reviews the different sketching methods and the modules that contain a particular sketching method. It also explains how the sketching methods are used.
Readers who are interested in learning, understanding, practicing, and teaching experience design, information design, interface design, and information architecture will find this book relevant.

  • Features standalone modules detailing methods and exercises for practitioners who want to learn and develop their sketching skills
  • Extremely practical, with illustrated examples detailing all steps on how to do a method
  • Excellent for individual learning, for classrooms, and for a team that wants to develop a culture of design practice
  • Perfect complement to Buxton’s Sketching User Experience or any UX text

Get your copy – click here


The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition – by Don Norman

http://amzn.to/2kLS7i9

In this entertaining and insightful analysis, cognitive scientist Don Norman hails excellence of design as the most important key to regaining the competitive edge in influencing consumer behavior.

Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious-even liberating-book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization.

The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time.

The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how-and why-some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.

Get your copy – click here


UX for Beginners: A Crash Course in 100 Short Lessons – by Joel Marsh

http://amzn.to/2BzDeqY

Apps! Websites! Rubber Ducks! Naked Ninjas! This book has everything. If you want to get started in user experience design (UX), you’ve come to the right place: 100 self-contained lessons that cover the whole spectrum of fundamentals.

Forget dry, technical material. This book—based on the wildly popular UX Crash Course from Joel Marsh’s blog The Hipper Element—is laced with the author’s snarky brand of humor, and teaches UX in a simple, practical way. Becoming a professional doesn’t have to be boring.

Follow the real-life UX process from start-to-finish and apply the skills as you learn, or refresh your memory before the next meeting. UX for Beginners is perfect for non-designers who want to become designers, managers who teach UX, and programmers, salespeople, or marketers who want to learn more.

  • Start from scratch: the fundamentals of UX
  • Research the weird and wonderful things users do
  • The process and science of making anything user-friendly
  • Use size, color, and layout to help and influence users
  • Plan and create wireframes
  • Make your designs feel engaging and persuasive
  • Measure how your design works in the real world
  • Find out what a UX designer does all day

Get your copy – click here


UX Research: Practical Techniques for Designing Better Products – by Brad Nunnally, David Farkas

http://amzn.to/2D3tE00

One key responsibility of product designers and UX practitioners is to conduct formal and informal research to clarify design decisions and business needs. But there’s often mystery around product research, with the feeling that you need to be a research Zen master to gather anything useful. Fact is, anyone can conduct product research. With this quick reference guide, you’ll learn a common language and set of tools to help you carry out research in an informed and productive manner.

This book contains four sections, including a brief introduction to UX research, planning and preparation, facilitating research, and analysis and reporting. Each chapter includes a short exercise so you can quickly apply what you’ve learned.

  • Learn what it takes to ask good research questions
  • Know when to use quantitative and qualitative research methods
  • Explore the logistics and details of coordinating a research session
  • Use softer skills to make research seem natural to participants
  • Learn tools and approaches to uncover meaning in your raw data
  • Communicate your findings with a framework and structure

Get your copy – click here


UX Strategy: How to Devise Innovative Digital Products that People Want – by Jaime Levy

http://amzn.to/2CDdOZ6

User experience (UX) strategy requires a careful blend of business strategy and UX design, but until now, there hasn’t been an easy-to-apply framework for executing it. This hands-on guide introduces lightweight strategy tools and techniques to help you and your team craft innovative multi-device products that people want to use.

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, UX/UI designer, product manager, or part of an intrapreneurial team, this book teaches simple-to-advanced strategies that you can use in your work right away. Along with business cases, historical context, and real-world examples throughout, you’ll also gain different perspectives on the subject through interviews with top strategists.

  • Define and validate your target users through provisional personas and customer discovery techniques
  • Conduct competitive research and analysis to explore a crowded marketplace or an opportunity to create unique value
  • Focus your team on the primary utility and business model of your product by running structured experiments using prototypes
  • Devise UX funnels that increase customer engagement by mapping desired user actions to meaningful metrics

Get your copy – click here


Also read:

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